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Master's degree programme in Information Studies - Introduction

Interaction between man and technology

The focus in the degree programme in Information Studies is on the interaction between people and information technology. You learn how organisations function and how to integrate IT in organisations. You also learn how to improve communication both internally and externally in companies and organisations and how to design user-friendly programmes.

The Master’s degree programme in Information Studies teaches you a number of analytical and practical tools and skills in the following areas: organisational theory, communication theory, society and business from a commercial and technological-historical perspective, theories about design, system development and programming, and learning theories. You therefore become able to work as a consultant or project manager in the public and private sectors.

Projects involving the business community

The teaching in the Master’s degree programme in Information Studies is largely based on project and group work where you work with cases and empirical data. In the projects, you work with examples from the business community and thus make contact with both private sector companies and public institutions. Many students also choose to undertake project-oriented training, i.e. an internship, as part of their degree programme.

Tracks

Information Studies is divided into three Tracks: Track A, Track B and Track C.

Track A is for students with a Bachelor’s degree with a major in Information Studies (i.e. the first two years of the Bachelor’s degree). In Track A, you have an opportunity to customise your degree programme and create an individual competence profile you can use in the business community or the public sector where Information Studies graduates are in demand. Examples are communication, design and programming of IT systems or organisational development.

Track B is for students with any humanistic Bachelor’s degree. Exceptions are Bachelor’s with a basic subject or supplementary subject in Information Studies or Computer Science. A Master’s degree programme in Information Studies gives you an opportunity to add new angles, theories and methodologies to your Bachelor’s degree, thus providing your studies with a vocational slant, for example within communication or organisational or systems development. You can also choose to test your academic skills by undertaking project-oriented training, i.e. an internship, in the business community.

In addition, there is a Track C for students with Information Studies as a supplementary subject who wish to complete a Master’s degree in Information Studies. Like in Track A, Track C gives you an opportunity to customise your degree and create an individual competence profile. Track C has a compulsory course during the first semester and is otherwise similar to Track A.


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02.10.2014